373 North L Street, Livermore, CA 94551

Nov 10, 2019

Why You Don’t Want a Joint Will

Why You Don’t Want a Joint Will

If you’re married, a joint will probably seems like it makes the most sense. After all, married couples share everything. But a joint will may not truly be in the best interest of the surviving spouse, and some states don’t even recognize them.

The Downside of Joint Wills

The main concern with a joint will is that it can only be revised so long as both spouses are alive and in agreement. It’s a tightly binding contract. This is most likely to become an issue if one spouse greatly outlives the other and there are unforeseen circumstances that arise. In this case, the remaining spouse must contest the will through court action should they wish to make changes.

While once common, joint wills are now rarely recommended. Depending on the document, the surviving spouse may not be able to manage funds according to life changes. For example, they may not be able to sell the family home if they wish to relocate or downsize, or to help grandchildren with the cost of college.  

Another reason joint wills can be problematic is if there are children from previous relationships, or the surviving spouse later remarries. Separate wills make it easier to sort out how assets are to be divided among beneficiaries. Another way to transfer wealth to children is to set up a trust, which may include any wishes or provisions.

Legal Advice

Joint wills are more likely to lead to costly probate litigation, and it’s important for the remaining partner to be able to amend their estate plan in order to address unexpected life changes. Laws vary by state, which complicates things. For alternatives to a joint will, it’s best to seek legal advice.

If you have questions about creating or revising your current will, please contact us at Lewman Law.

Share your views

About Lewman Law

Leave your comments here...

CAPTCHA *